Effect Of Manual And Physical Therapy For Pre- And Post-Spine Surgeries

Effect Of Manual And Physical Therapy For Pre- And Post-Spine Surgeries

Effect Of Manual And Physical Therapy For Pre- And Post-Spine Surgeries

Spine keeps all our body upright and the skeleton connected. Head, arms, pelvis and legs are all connected to our spine. A spine is made up of a chain of bones with elastic ligaments and disks in it. These ligaments and disks keep the spine flexible and that is how we can bend.
There are several factors than can cause pain in the spine. Spinal pain can be treated with a surgery or without one. In non-surgical treatment focus is on exercise and strengthening of the muscles.
However, in more severe cases a spinal surgery is performed to treat the root cause of the pain. It can be because of incorrect posture for extended periods of time and an accident or trauma birth defects can also cause spinal pain or complications.

Effects of Physical Therapy on Pre-Spine Surgery Patients:
A study was performed in 2016 to explore the effects of physiotherapy on patients awaiting spinal surgery. The study concluded that patients that underwent physical therapy before their surgeries had improved walking ability and lower extremity strength with degenerative lumbar spine disorders. The results of the study indicate that physiotherapy can influence functional capacity prior to surgical treatment and also has associations with post-operative physical therapy (PT).

Effects of Physical Therapy on Post-Spine Surgery Patients:
The effectiveness of PT cannot be denied when it comes to treating post-spine surgery patients. Almost every patient that has undergone a spine surgery is referred to physical therapy treatment. Physical therapy helps in rehab and also strengthening of the spinal muscles. It prevents further injury and also helps ensure a proper posture is created and further maintained after the spinal surgery.
Spine is one of the most important part of your skeleton and a surgery on it is a major surgery. The success of a spinal surgery is dependent on you making sure that the muscles supporting your spine are strong and that you maintain correct posture to avoid relapse.
PT after the surgery will start 4 to 7 weeks after surgery. It will start at a very slow pace and then will become a proper exercise routine to work on your muscles and posture while focusing on your wound. In first phase the patient is taught how to get in and out of the bed safely and properly, how to dress and not hurt him or herself. In addition to these other activities as how to go to the bathroom (if possible) is also taught. How to walk with a walker is also taught in this phase.
Very light transverse abdominis and pelvic floor contraction exercises are also taught to the patient. Safely mobilization of patient is the main aim of these exercises, especially patients who were bed ridden before the surgery can take longer time to reacquaint themselves.
It is strongly recommended that the patients should not undertake any exercise or routine themselves. This could not only cause pain but also damage the spine.
Once your physical therapist (PT) feel that the patient is now ready to move to the second phase of the therapy (6 to 10 weeks post-surgery), he will include exercises that includes (very light) lifting, pulling and pushing exercises. Your PT will show you exercise that help control pain and inflammation.

Physical Therapy brings you back to Normal:
There are about 4 phases which can last from 20 weeks post-surgery to almost a year. The goal is to bring the patient back to pre-injury state and improve their posture and lifestyle to avoid such an injury and damage to the spine. Your spine holds your whole body, and you need to have healthy and strong muscles to support your spine.
Research has shown that physical therapy is extremely effective in both pre-surgery and post-surgery spinal treatments.
At Unique Care Rehabilitation, we have all the pre- and post-spinal surgery physical therapy facilities. We are open Monday to Friday and also on Saturday and Sunday (on appointment) as well.

References:
[1] https://www.spine-health.com/wellness/exercise/rehabilitation-and-exercise-following-spine-surgery
[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4940916/
[3] https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12891-019-2850-3
[4] https://www.physio-pedia.com/Lumbar_Fusion_Rehabilitation
[5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279468/
[6] https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/recovery/low-back-surgery-exercise-guide/

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